UWinnipeg Hosted Gathering in Support of Truth and Reconciliation

Jim Bear, Chief Brokenhead Ojibway Nation; Brian Bowman, Winnipeg Mayor; Derek Nepinak, Grand Cief Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs; Jamie Wilson, Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba; Grey Selinger, Premier of Manitoba: Dr. Annette Trimbee, President and Vice-Chancellor, UWinnipeg

Jim Bear, Chief Brokenhead Ojibway Nation; Brian Bowman, Winnipeg Mayor; Derek Nepinak, Grand Chief Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs; Jamie Wilson, Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba; Greg Selinger, Premier of Manitoba: Dr. Annette Trimbee, President and Vice-Chancellor, UWinnipeg

An historic event attracted more than 700 people to UWinnipeg’s Riddell Hall and Eckhardt Gramatté Hall on June 2, 2015.

Five years after Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission began hearings, The University of Winnipeg hosted a gathering as the TRC Commissioners in Ottawa released their findings on Indian residential schools. The Time for Reconciliation event allowed people to share in this historic moment in the journey towards reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians. UWinnipeg’s event was in collaboration with the Province of Manitoba, the City of Winnipeg, Winnipeg Public Libraries, the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, and local faith groups. Read the TRC’s report here.

Derek Nepinak, Grand Chief AMC speaks at UWinnipeg June 2, 2015

Derek Nepinak, Grand Chief AMC speaks at UWinnipeg June 2, 2015

“The Truth and Reconciliation Commission was given an enormous task—to find the truth about the more than 120 year period when Indigenous children were sent to Indian residential schools, and to educate Canadians about this history and the ongoing impacts that are still felt across the country,” said Dr. Annette Trimbee, UWinnipeg’s President and Vice-Chancellor. “As an educational institution located on Treaty 1 land in the heart of the Metis Nation, we have a responsibility to support the TRC’s mandate, something we will continue to do long after its official close.”

 

 

People gather in Riddell Hall

People gather in Riddell Hall

“The closing events of the TRC represent an important time for our nation to come together and reflect on what we want the relationship with Indigenous people to look like,” said Wab Kinew, UWinnipeg’s Associate Vice-President of Indigenous Affairs. “However, first and foremost it is a time for us to hear the stories of residential school survivors and honour the strength, courage and grace they have shown in demanding justice for themselves and of this country.”

 

 

 

5 Comments

  • Heather Bjorklund said...

    I am not a residential school survivor, but am the daughter of one. All of my older half siblings went to residential schools. The only reason I didn’t was because I was raised in Winnipeg. Otherwise, I would have too. I am only 52 years old. This has had a very profound effect on my life, as I only knew of this in 1999, when I helped with a play that was about residential schools. It answered the “why” I kept asking about my life.

  • Sandra Chapais said...

    I am one and I am still living it, I have done my hearing in September, 2014 and I receive an answer in March saying that I will be receiving compensation. It didn’t happen, on the day I was to suppose to receive my money, the government stopped it to review it. Imagine the emotions I went through when I was told I wasn’t going to receive my payment, total disappointment. Especially when we were at the hearing, they told me it was all over. Yeah right, I got rid of most of my furniture because I believe them, now I have to find myself furniture. They lied to me twice, once at the hearing when they told me it was over and its not over because the second was is that they are refusing to give me compensation at this time which I am not. So I am still living it and it is not easy.

    • david budd said...

      we have a support prog in Wpg if interested.
      It’s Indian Residential School Resolution Health Support Prg. 214-181 Higgins Ave. Ph. 204 925 1205.

  • L S said...

    It is very sad to hear that Sandra, Im sorry. My dad recieved compensation in the 6 figures after spending over half his life incarcerated, the aftermath of Residential schools. He had cancer so he fast tracked his court and took the first deal, the lawyer took 50 000. And my dad spent the rest on nothing, like literally we had nothing to show for it. I think the compensation lead to more problems for us, as he is now dead, I believe he went even earlier because he partied and partied. Not to say this is something that you would do, just sharing my story. So my Dad and I had an awful lot of unecessary fighting and arguing in his last year, due to his compensation money. Sometimes when things are happening, they happen for a reason. I hope and will pray you get what the government owes you, as you are definately entitled to your compensation for what you had to go through.

  • Kyra said...

    As an alumni, I applaud the University of Winnipeg for hosting this event in support of the closing of the Truth and Reconciliation. Residential schools are a black mark on Canada’s history that should not be forgotten, so as to prevent anything such as that from repeating itself. I will be attending this event with my mother, also an alumni, who is a residential school survivor herself, along with her mother, my kokum, who is also a RS survivor.